Chanterelle Mushroom Harvest on the Key Peninsula


It’s mushroom hunting time on the Key Peninsula, and chanterelles are in season. It’s a laid-back sport, true, but requires eagle eyes. I’m just learning the ins and outs thanks to our friend and neighbor, Carla. When she shows up wielding her little curved knife, we know its time for another adventure in foraging.

Chanterelle in the Wild
Chanterelle in the Wild

If you don’t have a Carla to guide you, and you’re in Seattle, then Foraged and Found is one of several great places to get chanterelles.

Friends
Friends

Now, how do you eat these little fellers? First, wash them off to get the pine needles and forest floor off them. Then, tear them and drop into a pre-heated, dry frying pan (medium heat). They’ll start to release their waters. Stir them for as long as 20 minutes, until the released water is cooked off. Once they’ve cooked in their own liquids, add a decent-sized chunk of butter and some chopped tarragon and garlic. Sprinkle in some salt and pepper.

Cooking Out the Water
Cooking Out the Water
Side of Chanterelles
Side of Chanterelles

We had bbq tri-tip steak, grilled bread, and sauteed swiss chard (and some good red wine) to round out the dinner.

Slicing the Meat
Slicing the Meat
Dinner is Served
Dinner is Served

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Seattle Foodshed

Gardening, foraging, exploring and cooking. Time for a delicious adventure.

5 thoughts on “Chanterelle Mushroom Harvest on the Key Peninsula”

  1. That looks delicious and I can’t wait to hear all about the mushroom hunting expedition. Has their owl been back to visit?

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